Not sure what program is right for you? Click Here
CIEE

© 2011. All Rights Reserved.

Study Abroad in

Back to Program Back to Blog Home

10 posts categorized "Intercultural Learning"

12/22/2017

Advanced Liberal Arts, Fall 2017, Newsletter III

6a010536fa9ded970b01b8d10b2fe0970c-800wi

F3-0(CIEE ALA and UB students in the streets of Barcelona)

End of the term
Owen, Reed College
I will always remember my semester abroad with CIEE in Barcelona as a time of great personal growth.  As a study abroad experience, having to overcome the challenge of adapting to a whole new culture comes with the territory.  But in addition to that, having to conduct my personal and academic lives in a second language (and sometimes even a little of a third) proved to be a significant complicating factor at first.  During my first few weeks of classes at the University of Barcelona, I’d leave each class deeply concerned that I wouldn’t be able to pass the classes because I couldn’t understand the professors.  However insurmountable it all appeared at first, I discovered that with time came more comfort.  Now at the end of my semester, I feel almost like I’ve always been running around the city and taking my classes at the university with the friends I’ve made here.  It’s strange to remember that, in reality, I’ve only known them all for four short months.  Building a whole new life in a completely different country and language was something that all of my study abroad classmates and I have mentioned to one another as an incredible rewarding accomplishment.

F3-01(Owen –Reed College–, Florencia –University of La Verne–, Allison –Vanderbilt University–, and Lucía –Wellesley College– riding a bike...)

Give and Receive

Living and studying in another country inevitably involves being exposed to something different: a new language (of course), new customs and time tables that could be radically different from what one is used to, a different way to understand life, education, or even human relationships. The students of the CIEE Advanced Liberal Arts program in the University of Barcelona (UB) have the opportunity – and the good fortune, I would say – to be exposed to these differences from the very beginning of their stay in Barcelona: in their regular classes in the different departments of the UB, as well as in many diverse activities organized by CIEE through the term such as linguistic exchanges, cultural or volunteer activities, or through study groups at the CIEE Barcelona site led by UB local students. These personal relationships between American and Spanish students are not always easy, nor do they necessarily appear spontaneously. Like other aspects of life, personal relationships require time and dedication; it is necessary to accept from the first moment that what you give is also what you receive, but also that a person naturally receives what they give. It is the magical balance between giving and receiving.

F3-1(Sasha –George Washington University–, Nicole –Tulane University–, Maya –UC San Diego–, Kassandra –University of La Verne–, and Ralitsa –Columbia University–, in front of Bilbao Guggenheim Museum during the CIEE weekend trip)

When Samia and Dani, two students from the Philology department of the University of Barcelona, started their academic internships in October at CIEE Barcelona, I knew that, in their contact with the American students from our different study programs, they would quickly find this balance of giving and receiving. The tasks and goals of these two students were quite clear: take their first steps as educators taking the hands of some students that specifically needed these other “local” hands to guide them, and to improve their comprehension and integration into this new life and new educational system. But, I am not sure if Samia and Dani were aware during those first days of October that their generosity and fantastic work with the students would go in two directions. As I said before, they face the fortunate cycle of giving and receiving. These testimonials will better explain what I am trying to say…

Dani, UB Student
My name is Daniel Cuní Díez. This semester I collaborated with CIEE during my external curricular internship. I am currently seeking study a Master’s degree in Spanish as a Foreign Language in Professional Environments at the University of Barcelona. Because of my connection with the UB, I participated in some activities for the Advanced Liberal Arts program.

I have been able to improve my teaching practice by organizing tutoring sessions for the students that were taking Spanish language courses in CIEE Barcelona, but also leading study groups for the ALA students that were taking direct enrolment courses in the Spanish Philology Department at the UB. I assisted them, most especially on literary themes, since many of them do not have academic training in this area. In addition, I presented them with a general panorama of literature in Spain and in Europe, and I also resolved specific doubts they had about the topics. In my case, I focused on Spanish Illustration and I explained the contents through text analyses.

My experience has been really positive in several aspects, given that the relationship with the students was really close and rewarding. I have increased my overall competence in relation to Spanish as a foreign language and, most importantly, I learned new things about the American educational system, which is really different from the Spanish one.

F3-2(Alicia –Carnegie Mellon University–, Rocio –Wingate University–, and Emma –Columbia University– with Dani)

Samia, UB student
My name is Samia Aderdouch and I am a student intern seeking a Master's Degree in Spanish as a Foreign Language in Professional Environments at the University of Barcelona. I have completed my internship at CIEE and my experience in tutoring American students of the ALA program has been fantastic.

Typically, the tutoring sessions covered subjects that I had already studied while majoring in Hispanic Philology, so I was able to explain my own experiences with the subjects and professors and give them lots of advice as well. It has also been a great opportunity to see how American students are and what aspects are more difficult for them. For example, when discussing literature, they often did not know all the historical or literary context of the novels.

And since I had never given classes before, I discovered how they work, what things I have to improve on and what subjects are easier for me... And I've always tried to do my best by getting involved a lot and helping them to the fullest. My goal was that they pass their exams successfully–something I think I have achieved.

Additionally, the students were always very nice, so during the various classes I always felt very comfortable and that I had a good rapport with them, likely because our ages were very similar.

F3-3(Sophie –Princeton University–, Haley and Allison –Vanderbilt University–, and Emma –Columbia University–, with Samia)

Emma, Columbia University
Samia’s and Dani’s “tutorías” completely eased my transition into Spanish academic life. The classes I enrolled in at the University of Barcelona – Spanish narrative in the 20th Century and Spanish Enlightenment literature – took some adjusting to, especially because Spanish isn’t my native language. During the tutorías, I was able to ask Samia and Dani questions I hadn’t been able to pose in class, as well as have engaging discussions to supplement the UB’s more lecture-oriented style. Samia and Dani were quite knowledgeable about the subject matter and they were able to explain complex literary and philosophical concepts in a way that I could understand despite the language barrier. It was also nice to spend time with Spanish students whose interests are similar to mine. Overall, the tutorías were an academic highlight of my time in Barcelona!

F3-4

11/22/2017

Advanced Liberal Arts, Fall 2017, Newsletter II

6a010536fa9ded970b01b8d10b2fe0970c-800wi

Poetry and education

We live in an accelerated time and are led by the technological changes that are impacting our lives in many ways: from human relationships and communication to work and the easy access of information; and these are only a few examples. Education in general, and the university in particular, is not immune to these profound changes that have pushed our institutions toward a deeper revision of the ways and methods of teaching.

Paraninfo Nueva

(University of Barcelona Old Main)

It is easily verifiable that in these past years, the university has diverted its focus toward professional learning and the development of applied investigation. Its primary objective these days seems to be professional training in the diverse and specialized areas of the job market. But we cannot ignore that there are also many voices that have recently been raised alerting and asking us if we want, and if we can afford, a university that is mainly dedicated to professional development, therein marginalizing another type of intellectual training that permits us to educate committed citizens –those capable of understanding the present, judging it critically and thinking about a future for themselves and those around them– in a society that should be more free and reasonable. An important number of books and articles reminds us these days that without a solid understanding of history, anthropology, art, literature, philosophy and ethics, –these spaces of reflection that humanities can teach us– only with great difficulty can our youth be prepared for the complexities of the adult world. A few months ago, my colleague and friend, Dr. Paul DeYoung, Director of International Programs at Reed College, mentioned that our work as educators is “bringing new and important opportunities to young engaging minds that will lead our future.” Yes, Paul is right: we are educating our leaders, and we want –and need– the best leaders. Excellence, integrity, respect, collaboration: these are CIEE’s core values.

File-4

(ALA students in front of CIEE Barcelona)

Comienzo-quijote-1605

The students of the CIEE Advanced Liberal Arts program at the University of Barcelona (UB) are a good example that this indispensable equilibrium between technical training and a solid knowledge of humanities is not only possible but recommendable. To illustrate this point with a couple of examples, this term Sophie, from Princeton University, is taking the course “Artificial Vision” in the UB Computer Engineering Department and also the courses “The Spanish Narrative in the 20th Century” in the UB Spanish Department and “Literature & Cinema in Spain” at CIEE Barcelona. Meanwhile, Julio, from Columbia University, is taking courses at the UB such as “The History of Economic Thought” and “Philosophy of Law” along with “Photography” and “Masterworks in Catalan Art.” This combination of scientific and technical courses with humanities permits our/your students to incorporate these necessary and complementary perspectives during this important formative period of their lives.

File-5File-5

(CIEE "Contemporary Spain" class at the Catalan Parlament)

In my opinion, amongst all the humanities studies, few better facilitate the spiritual mission of education like poetry. It is because of this that at CIEE we offer our ALA program students the unique opportunity to attend a conference and poetry recital given by Joan Margarit, one of the most important poets in recent Spanish literature. Margarit’s recital and lecture was the inaugural act of our Semana Cultural (Cultural Week). His poetry teaches us that “culture is not decoration, it is as serious as penicillin, energy or electricity.” He believes that a poem is “an instrument with the same effect of science, which creates structures so that we do not suffer cold nor hunger and that we are cured of our disease.” For Margarit, “there is an inclemency that is not physical, but moral, which makes reference to loss and love, and where there exists no button like those in a furnace that we can push when we are cold”. In the face of this moral inclemency "there are few things that can help except perhaps poetry, paintings, fine arts, philosophy and, for some, religion. It is not much, but we have nothing else.” We can only say thanks to Joan Margarit for visiting CIEE Barcelona and for sharing his words, poems and wisdom with the CIEE ALA students.

File4

(Renowned poet Joan Margarit lecturing and reciting to the ALA program students)

Allison, from Vanderbilt University, wanted to share her impression of Joan Margarit’s recital with us:

Alison, Vanderbilt University

It was a once in a lifetime opportunity to hear Joan Margarit recite his poetry. The poems themselves are so rich in both personal and historical context, but they took on even greater meaning for me when I could hear his inflections and the emotion in his voice. Margarit made it clear in his discussion after the recitation that he feels poetry is an incredible outlet for the expression of impossible human emotions. We were then able to ask questions and engage with him and his writing on another level, asking about his inspirations, unintentional meanings, and the experiences that led him to write. I am so grateful to have met a poet who is a part of living Spanish literary history and who took the time to speak with us about his life's work. 

Three poems of Joan Margarit (with the authorization of the author):

IT WASN’T FAR AWAY OR DIFFICULT
The time has come
when life that is lost no longer hurts,
when lust is a useless light
and envy is forgotten. It is a time
of wise and necessary losses,
it is not a time for arriving, but for going away.
It is now that love
finally coincides with intelligence.
It wasn’t far away or difficult.
It is a time that leaves me only the horizon
with which to measure solitude.
The time of protective sadness.

TOAST
Closer through that which no one will ever know,
we raise our two glasses.
We see our light, each in the eyes of the other.
A man and a woman, in an instant,
can be wrong.
But the instant will never come back

(translated by Anne Crowe)

LA ÉPOCA GENEROSA
Nuestros, como canciones
que nos hacen llorar, son esos días
que fueron la verdad de los anocheceres
sonrientes y del baño de los niños.
El alegre cansancio de la cena.
Las caras que no han vuelto
a confiar como entonces.
La vida se alimenta de días generosos.
De dar y proteger.
Si se ha podido dar, la muerte es otra.

 

 

11/21/2017

Architecture + Design, Fall 2017, Newsletter II

Header_newsletter

Global Citizens

Part of CIEE’s mission is to make active and responsible Global Citizens and prepare them for the changes and challenges of future generations to come. They must be able to understand cultural differences, and therefore, developing soft skills which allow them to be flexible and adaptive are key points for students studying abroad. Through all of the academic obligations and cultural activities that the Architecture + Design students have been experiencing this semester, some have found the time to reflect on their soft skills and thoughtfully rethink what it means to be abroad.

Samantha, from Tufts University, is an excellent example of how to be proactive and motivated while abroad. Besides focusing on her classes at ELISAVA and CIEE, Samantha has taken a very active role in learning the local language. Even though she was not able to take any Spanish classes, her interest in learning it has driven her to expand her limits and take advantage of her experience. In order to further immerse herself in the community, she speaks Spanish with her host family and even volunteers at a local school. Recently, Samantha participated in a language class with 14-15 year old students—a project that was more than satisfactory for all of them.

Voluntariat escola 1

Voluntariat escola 2

Voluntariat escola 4

Another student, Giang, from Temple University, embodies the spirit of awareness and adaptability of being abroad. Born in Vietnam, she moved to the US while in high school and has been living there since. Her time now in Barcelona is her third experience abroad, after Tokyo and Prague. But since her first one, she’s realized the potential of being abroad to improve her soft skills, level of adaptability and to be more aware about intercultural aspects and mutual understanding. Check out this video! 

02/05/2016

DISCOVERING COMMON GROUND

One of our students, Charlotte, from Carnegie Mellon University, explains in her personal blog the adventures of being abroad. In one of her posts she writes about how her experience abroad with CIEE changed her mind and gave her the possibility of understanding the world in a more open-minded way:

As I embarked on this study abroad experience, my worst fear was that my Spanish would let me down. I have pursued a degree in Hispanic Studies in part because in my generation, knowing Spanish is of global importance. Despite my commitment to this venture of studying in Spain, in the beginning I doubted my ability to become a fluent Spanish speaker.

Over the past three months I have confronted this fear head on. Initially I became easily frustrated because I struggled to converse with native speakers. As September passed, however, increasingly I could hear the distinction between words. Although I was unable to respond quickly, I recognized that I had experienced major improvement in comprehension.

In the weeks that followed, my spoken Spanish improved as well. November 3rd marked the day when everything changed. It was as though I had acquired so much vocabulary that suddenly I was able to speak more fluidly. While shopping or at a restaurant, I was better able to express myself. I began to initiate casual conversation while waiting for the bus. It seemed that everywhere I went native Spanish speakers complimented my Spanish.

Despite this improvement in my spoken Spanish, as a perfectionist I continued to feel discouraged at times.  

One day I confided in Andrés, one of my favorite professors. From the start, Andrés inspired me. It was evident that he strongly values his students’ success, and there is never a moment when he is not enthusiastic, so I felt comfortable talking with him. “I would like to speak to you about something that is bothering me,” I told him.

- “Come in.”

- “I often find myself feeling embarrassed by my accent because everyone responds to me in English, which makes me feel incapable of speaking Spanish.”

Andrés reassured me: “It is very common to feel like that, but if people respond to you in English, it is usually because they want to practice their English. Don’t worry about it – you can continue speaking Spanish while the other person speaks in English. Often, when someone hears from your accent that you are American, they think, ‘Ah, an American, straight out of the movies!”

I laughed. Andrés has a way of making light of a situation, and I felt much better.

I began to recognize how much I had accomplished. As our program director said last week at our goodbye lunch, in four months we had become capable of communicating in Spanish at an advanced, academic level.

On Saturday, I headed to the airport at the crack of dawn with my two (extremely heavy) bags. I felt a mix of emotions as I absorbed for the last time the sites of Barcelona’s distinct streets.

My first flight took off from Barcelona, Spain en route to Newark, New Jersey. After ten hours of travel and little sleep, I sat, bleary–eyed, at a café near the terminal waiting for my final flight. A lively girl who looked about my age sat down at the same table. “I love your hat,” I said.

A second girl sat down at the table.    

- “Thanks! I didn’t realize I was still wearing it,” she responded, as she removed the festive Santa hat.

- “Where are you headed?”

- “I’m going to Italy, and my friend is going to India. I’ve been living in the U.S. for the past year and a half, and I’m excited to see my family.”

- “That’s funny, because I’m returning from living abroad myself! It’s so weird to hear English everywhere.”

Laughing, she responded, “That’s exactly how I felt when I first came to America. I could barely speak English, and it was even more difficult because in Italy we learn British English. For instance, I used to say accommodation instead of housing, which would always result in blank stares.”

It was gratifying to be able to share with someone from a different culture our parallel experiences. In this moment, I realized how much living in Spain had changed me. It opened my eyes to an expansive world, and showed me the excitement of finding commonality despite different backgrounds. I feel exhilarated to be returning to the U.S. with these insights and look forward to applying them to my life.

Spanish translation:

Antes de esta experiencia, mi mayor temor era que mi español me fallara. Planeaba una carrera en estudios hispánicos porque en mi generación la habilidad de hablar en español es útil. A pesar de mi compromiso con este viaje, al principio dudaba que pudiera adquirir un español fluido.

Durante estos tres meses, he enfrentado este temor directamente. Al principio, me frustraba mucho porque no podía charlar con hablantes nativos. Sin embargo, para finales de septiembre podía oír la distinción entre las palabras repentinamente; es decir, aunque no podía contestar rápidamente, vi una mejora en mi comprensión.  

En las semanas que siguieron, también noté una mejora drástica en mi español hablado. El 3 de noviembre fue el día en que todo cambió. Por el mucho vocabulario que había adquirido, de pronto tenía la habilidad de comunicarme con más fluidez. Cuando iba de compras o comía en un restaurante, sabía qué quería decir. Empecé a charlar con desconocidos mientras esperaba el autobús. Parecía que todo el mundo quedaba impresionado por mi español.

A pesar de esta mejora en mi español hablado, como soy muy perfeccionista me sentía cada vez más desalentada.

Un día hablaba con Andrés, uno de mis profesores favoritos. Desde el principio, Andrés me ha inspirado. Evidentemente le importa mucho el éxito de sus estudiantes, y nunca hay un momento en que él no esté pletórico de entusiasmo, y por eso me sentía cómoda hablando con él. “Quiero hablar contigo porque algo me está molestando”, le dije.

- “Pasa”.

- “A menudo tengo vergüenza de mi acento porque todo el mundo me contesta en inglés, dándome la sensación de que soy incapaz de hablar en castellano”.

Andrés me tranquilizó: “Es común sentirse así, pero si alguien te contesta en inglés, usualmente es que quiere practicar su inglés. Entonces cuando esto ocurre, no pasa nada – puedes continuar hablando en español mientras la otra persona habla en inglés. Muchas veces, cuando alguien oye por tu acento que eres americana, piensa, ‘¡Ah, una americana, salida de las películas!”

Me reí. Andrés tiene una forma de mantener el humor en una situación como esa, y me sentía mucho mejor.

Empecé a ver cuánto había logrado. Como el director del programa nos dijo la semana pasada en la comida de despedida, después de cuatro meses hemos llegado a ser capaces de comunicarnos en español con un nivel académico avanzado.

El sábado me dirigía al aeropuerto por la madrugada con mis dos pesadas maletas. Sentía una mezcla de emociones mientras admiraba la última vista de las pintorescas calles de Barcelona.

Mi primer vuelo fue desde Barcelona a Newark. Después de diez horas de viajar sin descanso, me senté –lánguida– en un café cerca de la terminal para esperar el último vuelo. Una chica de mi edad se sentó a la misma mesa muy animada. “Me encanta tu sombrero”, le dije.

Otra chica se sentó.

- “¡Gracias! No me había dado cuenta de que todavía estaba llevándolo”, me contestó mientras se quitaba su sombrero de San Nicolás.

- “¿A dónde viajas?”

- “Viajo a Italia, y mi amiga viaja a India. Llevo un año y medio en los Estados Unidos, y tengo muchas granas de ver a mi familia.”

- “¡Que casualidad! ¡Acabo de regresar del extranjero también! Es una locura escuchar inglés por todos lados”.

Riendo, me respondió, “Yo sentía lo mismo cuando llegué por primera vez a América. Apenas podía hablar en inglés, y fue aun más difícil porque en Italia aprendemos el inglés británico. Por ejemplo, solía decir “accommodation” en vez de “housing” y siempre provocaba miradas vacías”. 

Fue increíble relacionarme con alguien de otra cultura a través de una experiencia compartida. En aquel momento, me di cuenta de que Barcelona me había cambiado muchísimo. Abrió mis ojos a un mundo expansivo, y me reveló que es emocionante descubrir aspectos comunes a pesar de las diferencias innatas. Me entusiasma regresar a los Estados Unidos con estas perspicacias para aplicarlas a mi vida. 

If you want to know more about her experiences abroad, take a look at her blog Aventuras de Char.

11/26/2014

Volunteering in Barcelona. Beyond an experience

Rachel, from Howard University, has known how to take profit of her stay in Barcelona and besides her studies, she started a volunteering here. She has wanted to share her experience to explain us such an interesting experience abroad:

ASSIS voluntariado ALA y GAD (1)"I started volunteering at this facility called Assís every Tuesday since the end of September. Assís is a shelter that feeds the homeless & provides them with activities such as gardening classes, art classes, cooking classes, computer classes, & a small rec room for ping pong or just hanging out. Roger, the supervisor, told me this place was all about combating the loneliness, so even though my Spanish isn’t very good & my Catalan is nonexistent, the people who come to Assís would appreciate me just trying to acknowledge them. It’s mostly older men but I’ve seen a few younger men & a small number of women come through.

I’ve had about four different tasks while volunteering at Assís. I either served juice, worked in the kitchen cleaning, served food, or helped work bag check. My first day all I did was given the easiest task of serving people coffee, milk, hot water for tea, & orange juice. It was easiest because if they grabbed a certain type of cup from the service station it implied they wanted a certain drink, I couldn’t possibly mess that up. Some of those I served were really friendly & were asking me my name & where I was from, they could tell I was new. I was definitely practicing my Spanish skills here. There was another CIEE student volunteering here & a few other volunteers who spoke Spanish really well so they helped translate for me when I get too lost.

The next week I was put on kitchen duty. You would think that would have been the easiest task but it wasn’t. Nobody in the kitchen spoke English so when they were telling me what to do or what goes where I was just kind of staring at them super confused. But those ladies were the sweetest & they would just walk me through everything & explain it again very slowly. Who knew the kitchen could be such a confusing place? After the kitchen I started serving food & that was generally the same as serving the juice but I was communicating much better thanks to everyone’s help!

The next few weeks I was given a bigger role of storing the visitors’ bags. When I’m storing bags I have to fill out a log stating if they are regulars, male or female, if they are there to shower & eat or just eat, if they are Catalan or another identification & then tag their bags with a number so I know what bag correlates to which person. This job is probably the most difficult. I couldn’t always tell if a name is male or female at the end of the day when I had to record the daily totals. I didn’t always understand what people were saying. There were also a lot of bags & sometimes the people got frustrated when I didn’t find their bag fast enough but most usually helped point it out to me.

I’ve seen some of the people who are served at Assís out & about in Spain & I’ve met up with one of the other volunteers. The two men I saw on two different occasions were really excited to see me & introduced me to a few of there friends but I couldn’t really stay & talk too long because I was on my way to class both times. When I met one of the other volunteers we grabbed some coffee  & she helped me study for my Spanish mid-term. We also took a study break to just get to know each other.

Sometimes I couldn’t make it on Tuesdays due to my schedule but I tried my best because I enjoyed going there. It was a relaxing moment away from schoolwork & the busy city. I definitely felt better on the days I went versus the days I couldn’t make it. I really enjoyed this experience; everyone I met was wonderful & friendly".

07/25/2014

Newsletter: Summer Business Internship Program, Summer 2014

Newsletterbanner

The inaugural Barcelona Summer Business Internship program just ended last week, and it did so very successfully. The program's eight weeks flew by for the program participants, who took a Spanish class, an Internship Seminar and, most important, had real work experience in a Spanish-speaking context.

Click the links to read the full testimonials the summer Internship students left about their experiences:

Katrina & Briana: http://study-abroad-blog-barcelona.ciee.org/2014/07/summer-business-internship-program-2014-part-ii.html

Samantha & Coralee: http://study-abroad-blog-barcelona.ciee.org/2014/07/summer-business-internship-program-2014.html

Internship with GA
Internship students with their Guardian Angel (local student guide)

Summer Business Internship Program, 2014 :: Part II

Katrina, Student on our Summer Business Internship Program. Summer 2014

Katrina

Mi experiencia con mi practica ha sido una que no puedo duplicar. Mi practica aquí era con niños españoles en una escuela local.  No puedo tener una experiencia como esta en los estados unidos donde yo vivo porque no hay muchas españoles. Estoy estudiando español y es muy difícil para me in Nueva Hampshire para hacer una practica en español. 

Los niños eran un grupo de edades variedades.  Yo hablaba en Ingles a los mayores para practicar “speaking” para sus exámenes finales cuando ellos estaban en sus clases de la semestre.  Hablábamos sobre la moda, la tele, las universidades, el red, y los móviles.  Ellos estaban muy interesados con mi iPhone porque en España los iPhones no son común.

 El segundo parte de mi practica estaba sobre que ayude con un campo del verano, se llama “casal”. Ellos tienen edades desde tres a siete anos.  Ellos aprenden tres idiomas: Español, Catalán, y Ingles. Es increíble para oír tres idiomas en la mezcla de nuestro día para todo el día.  Hablábamos sobre todo y he aprendido como arreglar problemas en Español, una cosa que los profesores en su escuela no te enseña.  Este experiencia fue muy increíble y provechoso y yo no lo cambiaria.

Briana, Student on our Summer Business Internship Program, University of Evansville. Summer 2014 

Briana

Durante los dos últimos meses he trabajado en Audiconsultores, una empresa de auditorías. Aquí trabajé con el departamento de la contabilidad. Durante mi tiempo allí, he aprendido muchas partes distintas que se juntan para crear el departamento de la contabilidad. También he conocido personas muy ambles que trabajan conmigo. Siempre cuando tengo preguntas sobre cualquier caso están listos para explicar y ayudar si es posible. Me ha gustado hablar inglés a veces con ellos. Les gusta practicar para entender un poco mejor cuáles son las frases más usadas. Es en estos momentos, me siento en realidad parte del equipo. Mis colegas ya me han preguntado si iré a visitarles en Audi la próxima vez que estoy en Barcelona.

Es diferente trabajar aquí, porque las expectativas son muy diferentes. En los Estados Unidos, los becarios usualmente no tienen mucha responsabilidad y es más común que reciben muchas instrucciones y están “micro-managed”. Pero para mi experiencia, creo que he recibido mucha responsabilidad. He hecho proyectos en los que chequé los números de diferentes tipos de contabilidad. También he preparado unos documentos que estaban usando para los archivos de la empresa y para el uso de mis colegas. Durante este proceso me explicaron qué necesitaba hacer y me dejaron hacerlo sin muchas interrupciones. A veces me preguntaban si todo iba bien, pero nada más.

En general mi práctica era una buena oportunidad para aprender más de la contabilidad y para aplicar lo que he aprendido en la universidad, pero también cómo funciona la empresa y consultoría en España. Ha sido una gran experiencia y no la cambiaría para nada.

 

07/22/2014

Summer Business Internship Program, 2014

Samantha, Student on our Summer Business Internship Program, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Summer 2014 

Sin título
La nueva práctica

Todavía recuerdo cuando nerviosamente me fui del ascensor y llegaba a un escritorio de recepción con las letras grandes y elegantes de ‘Audi Consultores’ por la primera vez.  Fue el primer día de mi primera práctica y estaba en un país y una empresa desconocida y en un lugar donde mi idioma nativo no era hablado. En casi todos los aspectos, fue un mundo nuevo. 

Sin embargo, ahora es dos meses más tarde y no cambiaría ningunas de estas diferencias.  Mi experiencia aquí estudiando y trabajando en Barcelona ha sido invaluable.  En particular, mi práctica en la empresa AudiConsultores me ha enseñado muchísimo sobre los negocios y como adaptarme a una cultura completamente nueva para trabajar.  Desde el primer día, ellos me dieron mucha responsabilidad al cumplir proyectos en las áreas del marketing y de las finanzas.  Aprecié esto muchísimo.  No solo fui vista como un becarillo para hacer tareas muy rutinarias, sino como un empleado quien podía hacer contribuciones significativas a la empresa. 

Por ejemplo, cumplí un proyecto para un cliente en que necesitaba investigar el mercado nuevo de resiliencia urbana para ayudarles creando un reporte para inversores potenciales.  Mucho del resto del tiempo fue analizando los documentos financieros de muchos de sus clientes y condesando la información en resúmenes y gráficos.  En todo, fue una experiencia genial que me ayudó con mis aspiraciones de mi carrera mientras pensaba un verano en una de las ciudades mejores del mundo.  

Coralee, Student on our Summer Business Internship Program, Texas Christian University. Summer 2014  

10402057_10203533223623545_3583033621176131135_n

Estos últimos dos meses han sido una gran experiencia de aprendizaje para mi, desde vivir con una familia a actividades culturales en mi vida diaria en Barcelona. También he tenido la oportunidad de hacer una práctica y trabajar en una escuela aquí. Mi experiencia allí me ha permitido ver muchas cosas y conocer a mucha gente que si no hubiera hecho no habría conocido.

Trabajo en una escuela que se llama Montseny 16 horas cada semana. Ellos tienen niños de 3 hasta 17 anos. He trabajado con casi todas las edades haciendo una variedad de cosas. He trabajado con el departamento de inglés, inglés en extra escolar y niños pequeños durante casal. Para el departamento de ingles ayudé niños con su inglés hablado. En extra escolar ayude a niños que iban a tomar el examen de ingles de Cambridge University Certificate y preparé actividades y lecturas para un grupo que iba a ir a Inglaterra. Finalmente, en el casal cuidé a los niños y tuve la oportunidad de practicar mi castellano con ellos.

Mi parte favorita de mi práctica también probablemente era la parte mas difícil: era de ver las interacciones entre los idiomas. El idioma oficial de Montseny es Catalán, un idioma que no entiendo. Es difícil de estar en el medio de personas que hablan un idioma que no entiendes. Pero después de un tiempo yo pude entender un poquito de Catalán escuchando muy atentamente a palabras que parecen como Castellano. Yo conocí personas que tienen dos idiomas maternos y fue muy interesante verles cambiando entre idiomas fácilmente. También pude ver la enseñanza de idiomas en un lugar donde valoran el conocimiento de muchos idiomas. Aunque fue difícil al principio, aprendí mucho de esta situación y al final fue mi parte favorita.  10547567_10203533222903527_6389544356626158988_n

 

12/20/2013

Liberal Arts, Fall 2013, Issue III

Bannermewsletter

It has been a wonderful semester!  We are very proud of this outstanding group of students who have been very engaged in their academic, cultural and learning experience while in Barcelona. Thanks for a great semester and we hope they keep practicing their Spanish!!!

Museo Chocolate LA 007

These are some of the last activities students did:

Hiking and Calçotada

The best evaluated daytrip among students is the hike and calçotada. LA students went to the hills of Barcelona where they hiked for 1.5 hours and then were compensated with a traditional Catalan meal: the calçotada. Students learned the skill of dipping the calçot (a kind of leek) in romesco sauce and then ate it with their hands.  They really enjoyed the day and this gastronomic adventure.

IMG_2210

IMG_2225

Chocolate Museum

Quijotes students attended a chocolate workshop at the Chocolate Museum of Barcelona. We had a great time and students enjoyed making different products like chocolate bars, lollipops, or bonbons using various techniques. Students showed their creativity and made funny and some extravangant shapes.

Museo Chocolate LA 065
Museo Chocolate LA 067

Re-entry Workshop

LA students participated in the Re-entry Workshop, a session dedicated to reflect on their experience studying abroad in Barcelona, to understand the re-entry process and challenges, to learn strategies for adjustment and ways to stay globally engaged and to incorporate their experience into their daily lives. One of the activities consisted in sharing their best memory of the semester forming a web between them symbolizing their interconnection. Some of the best memories of our students were related to their experience with their host family; their volunteering; or their travelling.

11/10/2011

Films about (or set in) Barcelona


Whether you want to get an idea of what Barcelona looks like, or you've been here and want to reminisce, here are a few films about or at least filmed in, Barcelona. Make a big bowl of popcorn (or maybe some Bravas and croquettas) and enjoy:

    • Biutiful. Directed by Alejandro Gonzálex Iñárritu (2010).
      From the director of Amores Perros, this film brings Javier Bardem back to Barcelona for this chilling drama. Bardem won Best Actor at Cannes and was nominated for an Oscar for this role. TRAILER.

 

  • Rec. Jaume Balagueró & Paco Plaza (2007).
    A real-time horror film set throughout the city as a news reporter and her camera man shadow the local fire department for a night. TRAILER.
  • Inconscientes (Unconscious), Joaquín Oristrell (2004).
    Set in 1914 this is a fun period comedy showcasing lots of modernism. TRAILER.

  • Little Ashes, Paul Morrison (2008).
    Robert Patterson plays Dalí, although according to most reviews, he does so quite badly. Filmed in Barcelona and Cadaqués. TRAILER.
  • Barcelona, directed by Whit Stillman (1994).
    While filmed in the post-olypic era, the film is set in the 1980s as an expat and his American cousin try to navigate the Barcelona dating scene. TRAILER.
  • Salvador (Puig Antich). Directed by Manuel Huerga (2006).
    Based on the true story of a Catalan anarchist in the 1970s exectued under the Franco regime. TRAILER.
  •  Todo Sobre Mi Madre (All About My Mother), directed by Pedro Almodóvar (1999).
    Filmed in Madrid, A Coruña, and Barcelona. TRAILER.
  • Pan Negro, dir. Augustí Villaronga (2010).
    Dark drama about a boy growing up post-civil war in Catalunya. TRAILER.
  • Wheels on Meals, Sammo Hung Kam Bo (1984).
    Nothing like a Jackie Chan movie set entirely in Barcelona. FULL FILM. There is a great little montage at 54mins.

  • Tapas,  Jose Corbacho and Joan Cruz (2005).
    Interlocking stories of several neighbors in the suburb of l´hospatelet. TRAILER.
  • En la ciudad (In the City), Directed by Cesc Gay (2003).
    A middle class group of friends gets together often to talk about life and love. TRAILER.
  • The Machinist (la machinista), Brad Anderson (2004). 
    Almost cheating since the film is set in the US, but it was actually all filmed in Barcelona.  TRAILER.
  • Uncovered (La Tabla de Flandes), Jim McBride (1994).
    Can't find a trailer, but the film stars Kate Bekinsdale as she uncovers clues to an old murder while restoring a painting.

  • Mientras Duermes, (Sleep Tight) Jaume Balaquero (2011).
    Thriller about the portero of a Barcelona apartment building. TRAILER.

  • The Cheetah Girls 2, Kenny Ortega (2006).
    Horrible Disney film, but if you've got the stomach for it, click here. I think the entire film is on youtube.

  • Garbo: The Spy, dir. Edmond Roch (2009).
    A documentary about Joan Pujol Garcia, a spy during World War II. TRAILER

Barcelona movies1

**You can borrow many of these DVDs from La Casa, ask at reception.
*** If it's reading you're after, don't forget to check out our list of Books about Barcelona.

Let me know if I've missed something! Happy viewing!